Granville Then and Now

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By Erik Pekar

There were several news items and happenings of interest in Granville a century ago, as reported in the Feb. 15, 1924, issue of the Granville Sentinel.

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People were engaging in common winter pastimes in this area, including at Lake St. Catherine: “Druggist Lasher of Granville and Chandler Hopson of Wells tried out the ice fishing in the little lake Friday and had satisfactory success. The heavy part of the job was cutting the holes which Lasher kindly permitted Hopson to do. However, Lasher supervised the job and saw that they were cut scientifically. Eight fine pickerel were secured, the largest weighing upwards of twelve pounds.” It may have been warm for February last weekend in 2024, but it certainly wasn’t as warm this time in 1924.

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A few local couples received boxes bearing the fruits of harvest: “Fresh picked from the fruit groves of Florida, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Potter, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Fyfe and Mr. and Mrs. J.L. McArthur were the recipients of boxes containing oranges, tangerines, pomegranates and kumquats this week from Mr. and Mrs. John DeKalb, who are stopping at Fort Lauderdale, Fla.”

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Granville’s local council of the Knights of Columbus was active with events: “The annual fair and bazaar of the Knights of Columbus was a big success, financially and in every other way. There were various attractions each evening besides dancing. The Granville high school and Juckett’s orchestra furnished the music.”

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Another example of modern technology being used in the area, and was reported in the Truthville personal mention column: “The snow plow has been used on the highway for the first time this winter and harvesting ice seems to be the order of the day. The ice is of fine quality taken from the river above the dam.” There is no longer a dam at Truthville, but the ruins of its outbuildings can be seen looking east while crossing the Truthville bridge on County Route 12.

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An incident was recorded in the Wells column: “Alvah Clayton, while unloading phosphate from a railroad car at Norton’s switch in Granville Wednesday, received painful injuries as a result of the sleighs running over both legs. The team became frightened by a passing train and ran. Mr. Clayton, in his efforts to stop the runaways, got under the runners which passed over both legs and he was dragged some little distance and his right cheek badly lacerated. He was carried into the office of the switch and later taken to Dr. Sumner’s office, who took him to his home after five stitches were taken which were necessary to close the wound in the cheek. While the patient suffered considerable pain last night he is resting more comfortably to-day. The team was caught on Church street and taken to E.E. Paul’s shed. They were not hurt at all.” While not uncommon in 1924, transportation by means of a horse drawn sleigh was already on its way out in the 1920s.

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A resolution of respect was announced this week in 1924, a few months after the happening that led to the resolution: “At the meeting of the stockholders of the Telescope Cot Bed company, held February 5, 1924, the following resolution was offered by Robert Owens and it was unanimously accepted:

“Whereas, M.J. Hayes departed this life on October 20, 1923.

“Be it resolved that the stockholders of the Telescope Cot Bed company express upon the minutes of this company their sense of personal loss of one who endeared himself to those privileged to work and associated with him, whose word was his bond, and whose disinterested support of public interests made him a tower of strength to the community in which he lived. – The Telescope Cot Bed company, president, Henry J.W. Vanderminden; secretary, S.E. Everts.”

M.J. Hayes was the owner of the Hayes Market on Main Street in Granville, a meat market in a building that stood on the site of the public parking lot next to the Station House Bed and Breakfast and the rail trail. The secretary was Granville attorney Silas E. Everts; among his children was a daughter, Miss Miriam Everts, longtime English teacher at the Granville High School. The mention of Henry J.W. Vanderminden as president of Telescope will bring about the question of “which one,” as there were two men by this name involved with the company in 1924, a father (Sr.) and a son (Jr.).

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An event was held at the grounds of the South Granville Congregational Church: “The hash supper at the church parlors Tuesday night was well attended. The Pawlet orchestra was unable to be present on account of the weather and this was somewhat of a disappointment. This did not cause a lack of excellent music, however, as an orchestra of Asa Ackley, Mrs. George Cuthbert, Dorothy Cuthbert and Parrish Moore of West Pawlet furnished it in a most pleasing manner. In addition to the orchestra a trio made up of Mrs. Cuthbert, pianist, Asa Ackley, cellist and Dorothy Cuthbert, violinist, rendered selections that were appreciated by all and a piano duet by Mrs. Ackley and Miss McDonough was much enjoyed. They were accompanied by Mrs. William Ackley. At the close of the program Leon Duel and Edward Shields rendered a selection on the violin and piano. There were several from Granville present during the evening.”