County facilities to offer NARCAN doses

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The Washington County Board of Supervisors agreed on Aug. 19 to have strategic locations within county facilities posess Naloxone (NARCAN) boxes.

The Washington County Board of Supervisors has approved the placement Naloxone (NARCAN) boxes in designated locations within county facilities.

At its Aug. 19 meeting following the recommendation of the county’s public safety committee, the board agreed unanimously that eight boxes in strategically placed locations will have NARCAN boxes available to community members and in personnel-only locations if needed, provided by the Adirondack Health Institute and Alliance for Positive Health at no cost to the county.

Prior to the board’s approval, Hartford supervisor Dana Haff posed a question in regard to the effectiveness of the shots.

“I have a question, I’m sorry I don’t know the answer. Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid 100 times stronger than morphine and quite often when you have a fentanyl overdose, you need more than one Naloxone nasal spray or injection,” Haff said. “Do these boxes, will they have one or two in them?”

NARCAN doses are being provided by Adirondack Health Institute and Alliance for Positive Health at no cost to the county.

Deputy director of public safety Tim Hardy and county attorney Roger Wickes said each box will have two shots of NARCAN and will be checked periodically along with the automated external defibrillators (AEDs) on site.

“We’re going to monitor them very closely in the beginning just to see what’s going on with them, and then of course if the use is there in the forefront, we will refill them,” Wickes said. “It’s part of our program so when we need to refill them, we’ll go to these folks (Adirondack Health Institute and Alliance for Positive Health), and I think they’re going to stockpile to get us going.”

White Creek supervisor James Griffith’s big question for Wickes and Hardy was if there would be cameras overlooking the boxes.

“No, not that kind, when I say ‘monitoring,’ people are going to be checking them to see what their status is. Most of them are going to be located in hallways that have cameras,” Wickes said.

“We’ll have good visibility on these,” Hardy said.

Answering Kingsbury supervisor Dana Hogan’s question, Wickes said the alliance will provide training on how to properly use the Naloxone boxes as soon as the program gets rolling.