Buddy the baseball – Magic, wisdom & friendship, part 2

By Steve Trout

Last week, Billy found an old baseball . . .

. . . He looked around his room. “Mom, is that you?” He started to play with his train set, but then he heard the voice again: “The homework.”

He turned and looked at the ball. “Okay, ball, did you just say something?”

“Yes.”

“That’s impossible.”

“No, it’s not.”

Billy shook his head, but he listened, so he went back to his homework. 43 x 42 is 1,806; then add 11 and it totals 1,817. The next one, 52 x 28 is 1,456, add 8 and it’s 1,464. He checked to see if he’s right. “I see where my problem is, I give up too easy.”

“Yes, remember that,” he heard.

Billy started to play with his Legos and then he turned his attention to his train set. Normally, he would play until his mom told him it was time to turn off the lights. Instead, after a few minutes he put away the toys and sat back down at his desk and opened up his math book. He sharpened his pencil and took out some paper. He was getting one right after the other. Looking over at Buddy, he said, “I’m starting to figure this out.”

“Yes,” he heard.

The next morning Billy threw his pajamas on the floor on top of his other clothes. Then he brushed his teeth, rubbed some gel in his hair and grabbed his school bag. He looked over at Buddy, “See you later.”

“Your room.”

Billy stopped at the door and looked back. He dropped his bag and hurried to clean up his clothes and make his bed. He also found a few Lego pieces that had been missing.

After his math test Billy’s teacher handed Billy his paper, and there was a happy face next to his grade, “B,” his best grade all year in math. “Billy, you did so well, what’s the difference?” his teacher asked.

“I’m studying harder and telling myself I can do it,” he replied.

Billy hurried home after school. He remembered it was garbage day so he dragged the two cans out to the curb. “Thank you so much, I didn’t even have to ask you,” his mother said.

“Mom, I just want to help out more. By the way, I got a B on my math test.”

“Billy, I’m so proud of you. Keep up the good work.”

When he opened the door to his room, he liked the way it looked.

“Hey, Buddy, let’s go fishing. I want to show you how to catch a fish.”

Once Billy got to the pond, he took Buddy out of his pocket and put him on the shore. Billy put a worm on his hook and made a cast. A few minutes went by, and then the bobber went under the water. He started to reel in the fish, but it managed to get away. “I guess I won’t catch a fish today. Let’s go.”

“Stay,” Billy heard.

Billy looked over at Buddy and then grabbed his rod to put a fresh worm on the hook. He made a cast and sat down. “Hey, Buddy, I wish I had a brother or a sister to do things with. I worry about my dad, but Mom said he’s going to be home soon. It can get a little lonely at times, but now I have you and I feel better.”

“Eyes on the bobber,” he heard.

Billy saw the bobber dip under the water, and then he reeled in the biggest fish he’d ever caught. “Look at this fish! He’s got giant whiskers, my first catfish!” Billy exclaimed.

On the walk home, Billy held Buddy in his hand and asked him, “How did you get this magical power?”

“Magic can’t be explained.” . . .

Read part 3 of “Buddy the baseball,” and read our interview with Steve Trout.